Three Ways to Bloom in Place

by | Mar 13, 2019 | Blog | 3 comments

I’ve had the opportunity this week to do one of my favourite things; tidy up the garden. I noticed how much my spirits lifted with the presence of dirt under my fingernails, and a sense of mastery over mess. What is it about digging about in dirt, and tidying up ‘bits’ that creates in me such a sense of peace and that things are once again right with the world? Do these activities have the same effect on you?

The soil we live in. 

When we pot up small plants, we are trusting that with time and care they will spread both roots and leaves wide. Sinking our fingers into rich new compost, mixing it through the more tired soil, we know that the goodness will refresh and feed the plants to come. Cutting back the dead leaves of plants, we offer the new growth space to move.

Time. Enrichment. Space to grow. 

Where do you need time?

Do you find yourself rushing yourself into growth; force-feeding yourself all the things that should get you growing faster? Is it possible to simply trust that time will produce the fruit you are longing for? Where can you offer yourself the gift of time?

Where do you need enrichment? 

What do you need to feed your physical, mental, emotional needs? Are you getting the nutrition, rest, or stimulation that gives you energy to grow? Take time to take stock, and reach for the things you need to enrich the soil from which you may bloom.

Where do you need space to grow? 

Let’s talk environment. I, like many other Third Culture Kids, feel restless if my physical environment remains static for too long. If I choose not to change country or house, it’s likely I will find myself changing furniture around, or switching up the interior decorations. This is okay! Find a constructive way to give yourself an environment that stimulates your growth, that inspires your creativity, that offers the peace you need to bloom. If necessary, have a cull of all the ‘things’ that you have accumulated that block your creativity or clutter your surroundings. Cut away the dead to make space for new growth. Half the time, that cull will help you realise all the wonderful things you do have around you that were getting buried under ‘stuff’.

The dirt under my fingernails reminds me of my rootedness to this earth, this soil, this place. Where I am right now is where I chose to spread my roots, deep and wide. And who knows, perhaps I shall shoot my leaves skywards, and bloom!

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Dan Elyea

    Good metaphor, Dr. Rachel. (Though I cringe at the culling aspect.)

    You’ve come up with a different way to state one of my favorite sayings: Bloom where you are, or Bloom where you’re planted. It’s a wonderful thing to see this in life.

    It’s kinda tough to bloom in my winter years . . . good thing I live in Florida! Maybe I should be happy that there still are some bits of green showing. 🙂

    Dan

    Reply
    • Dr. Rachel Cason

      I’m sure you are still busy blooming, Dan! Thanks for reading!

      Reply
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